Vehicle Dynamics Conference
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2014 Conference Programme

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Day 1

Tuesday 24th June
OEM Forum

Conference Chair - Magnus Roland, president & CEO, Swedish Advanced Automotive Business AB, Sweden

09:40 - Integrated collision avoidance by active intervention for intelligent vehicles
Jitendra Shah, senior research engineer, Ford Forschungszentrum Aachen GmbH, Germany
A considerable proportion of road accidents are attributed to rear-end collisions, lane-change collisions and run-off-road events. An integrated design of information, warning and intervention system might help reduce these types of accidents. This work presents an approach to how rear-end, lane-change and run-off-road collisions can potentially be prevented, and explains the required architecture and control concept. A common dynamic path planner and controller combining braking and steering intervention has been developed. A safety shield concept for cascaded HMI has been implemented for longitudinal and lateral threat. It is accompanied by winter test results.
10:10 - 918 Spyder – technologies for advanced vehicle concepts
Dr Peter Schäfer, vice president Chassis Department, Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Germany
The 918 Spyder defines new standards in the segment of super sports cars. It offers an outstanding driving performance as well as optimal efficiency and driving comfort for everyday use. The objectives of the 918 Spyder development and the hybrid concept including the electric Porsche Traction Management and the hybrid braking system are presented. The rolling chassis and the mechatronic chassis systems are introduced, which are the key to precise handling, high driving performance and optimal ride comfort. The 918 Spyder displays a high level of innovation, and the developed technologies will soon be found in future Porsche vehicles.
Break
11:00 - Active vehicle ride and handling development by using integrated SIL/HIL techniques in a high-performance driving simulator
Diego Minen, managing and technical director, Vi Grade, Italy
Dynamic Driving Simulators are becoming more and more popular in the automotive industry for developing equivalent-to-real full vehicle testing. They embed detailed in-SW or in-HW description of all the passive and active vehicle subsystems, for combined ride&handling maneuvers: professional drivers have access to an accurate reproduction of the real vehicle and, within a new revolutionary approach to vehicle engineering, they work with engineers to significantly influence the design of the on-dev vehicle real prototype. Key factors for the effectiveness of a dynamic driving simulator are vehicle and road model accuracy, graphics/sound/vibration quality, realism of human interface, effective motion cueing and the ability to correlate parametric results between simulation and reality. Balancing all the factors is the real issue, and doing it properly within all the constraints of a simulated reality is one of the main challenge for the OEMs and the simulator supplier. VI-grade is working together with several auto makers to fine tune the vehicle models on the driving simulator in order to minimize the on-platform vs. on-vehicle driver feeling difference, and presents here some examples.
11:30 - Topological geometry dynamics as key words for future vehicle dynamics
Magnus Roland, president & CEO, Swedish Advanced Automotive Business AB, Sweden
Vehicle Systems Dynamics 2003, Vol. 39 states: 'It is not completely clear what exactly makes vehicles ‘easy to handle’. Vehicles are complex systems with human beings in the control loop…it is not yet quite clear which behaviour determines ‘good handling’.' Vehicle dynamicists with capacities of visceral experiences of driving should guide the engineering development of vehicle control from the workings of two fundamentals: ‘gravity’ and ‘mind and consciousness’. Vehicle dynamics in 2014 cannot build upon classic mechanics dating back to Newton in 1770. Gyroscopic instantaneous action caused by spin and conservation of momentum are important prerequisites for good handling.
Lunch
Workshop Part 1 - MSC.ADAMS to host 'The process for optimizing and studying the effects of suspension parameters'
14:00 - Grip and thermodynamics sensitive tyre/road interaction forces estimation and modelling
Dr Flavio Farroni, technical consultant & vehicle dynamics researcher, Ferrari SpA & Naples University, Italy
The fundamental role that tyres have played in motorsport and in the automotive industry in recent years, and the growing need to reproduce with a high level of detail the phenomena concerning vehicle dynamics, have given a strong impulse to research in the field of vehicle systems analysis and modelling. The presentation focuses on the proposal of an innovative procedure able to estimate, analyse and model tyre/road interaction characteristics based on the employment of the friction and thermodynamics models (GrETA and TRT) developed by our vehicle dynamics research group in collaboration with tyre and vehicle manufacturers.
14:30 - Optimising tyre inflation pressure for vehicle performance
Maelle Dodu, advanced chassis engineering, Jaguar Land Rover, UK
The tyre, with its contact patch, is the only link between the vehicle and the ground and, as such, plays a fundamental role in almost all the vehicle attributes. During a new vehicle development, the tyre is designed and tuned to reach a specific balance between these different vehicle attributes. This balance of performances is defined to fit with the OEM brand aspirations and the vehicle market positioning. However, one parameter can dramatically alter this hard-to-achieve balance: the tyre inflation pressure. This presentation will show how an OEM can make the best use of it for improved vehicle performance.
Break
Panel Discussion - Vehicle Dynamicists: servants to the marketing department and journalists? Key vehicle dynamicists to take part: - Dr. Peter Schäfer, director chassis development, Porsche AG Magnus Roland, founder and owner, SA2B Damian Harty, senior staff engineer, CAE Group at Polaris Industries John Heider, vehicle dynamics development, Cayman Dynamics Tim Roebuck, function leader, Vehicle Dynamics, R&D, Lotus Engineering Chris Regan, senior project manager, Honda Research & Development Andy Kitson, vice director Chassis, SAIC Motor UK Technical Centre Karsten Schebsdat, manager of Passenger Car Chassis Tuning Jürgen Pützschler, senior engineer, Volkswagen Ag Simon Newton, chief engineer - Driving Dynamics, Williams Advanced Engineering Ruediger Hiemenz, engineering director, MANDO Corporation Guy Mathot, head of Vehicle Dynamics Development, FORD C Cars & Focus

*This program may be subject to change

Day 2

Wednesday 25th June
Development and Tuning

Conference Chair - John Heider, Vehicle Dynamics Development. Testing. Training, Cayman Dynamics LLC, USA

09:00 - Advanced target setting for front-loading development process with virtual tools
Guido Toslin, project engineer, Chassis Development, Applus+ IDIADA, Spain
The increasing pressure to deploy virtual tools in a wider spectrum of applications and development phases with high accuracy and efficiency demands precise target-setting processes. Applus+ Idiada has been using advanced measurement techniques to characterise vehicle dynamics performance for over a decade. This database information is now a key asset that permits identification of the descriptive parameters and set ranges linked with different types of performance styles, vehicle concepts and branding differentiation. Advanced target setting is therefore possible by crossmatching subjective rates with the right combinations of metrics through an extensive number of vehicle results.
09:25 - Latest in motion cueing provides low latency handling experience
Edwin de Vries, Senior Vehicle Dynamics Engineer, Cruden B.V., Netherlands
Cruden leads the field of motion simulators for vehicle dynamics and now offers a versatile interface to define novel motion cueing approaches. Imposing the vehicle side-slip angle on the platform’s yaw angle avoids washout- and cueing filters; a dynamic varying yaw pole enriches the driver’s handling perception. By replaying racecar driving, the platform motion can be analysed repeatably and objectively. The latency of platform motion with respect to simulated vehicle shows the benefit of providing acceleration next to position and velocity input. This session shows our new simulator handling experience and provides the architecture for creative motion cueing.
09:50 - Slippery road detection using EPAS only signals
Mariam Swetha George, Product Engineer, Nexteer Automotive, USA
The conventional method of estimating road surface friction uses wheel slip computed from non-EPAS sensor signals. These are either expensive, dependent on tire signals or provide late detection. Road friction feedback is of importance in itself to the driver, but friction information is also needed in other safety related functions. This presentation highlights the use of EPAS only signals to determine tire - road friction. Detecting slip using EPAS signals can be potentially faster than using yaw rate and lateral acceleration as these follow steering signals. At the minimum, it will provide an inexpensive early warning to the driver.
10:15 - Systems engineering approach to conceptual design of vehicle handling dynamics
Mandar Hazare, doctoral research assistant, Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR), USA
It is important to have a systematic approach to design of vehicle handling dynamics, to ensure that the final products meet customer expectations while reducing concept development time, balancing other conflicting functions, avoiding late design changes and over-engineering wrt cost and weight. In this research, a simulation-based vehicle handling design methodology based on a systems engineering approach using decomposition-based target cascading principles (most applicable during the concept development phase) is developed. This systems engineering-based simulation framework connects the customer requirements to vehicle-level targets, subsystem-level requirements and component-level design specifications using a multi-objective optimisation scheme.
Break
11:00 - Adaptation of Vehicle Dynamics Simulation Software to ADAS Applications
Dr Thomas Gillespie, Director of Product Planning, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, USA
Vehicle dynamic simulation programs are required CAE software tools used to develop ADAS systems. In conjunction with real or simulated sensors, CarSim provides the test vehicle, testing environment and driver which allows ADAS engineers the capability to sense the surrounding environment, evaluate the situation, and determine what response is required for best safety performance. Developers of vehicle dynamics simulation tools have taken on the role of adding more sensing capabilities to improve vehicle dynamics models for future ADAS requirements. This presentation will describe some of the sensing extensions available in CarSim.”
11:25 - Models and controls of vehicle dynamics designed directly from data
Prof Mario Milanese, CEO, Modelway Srl, Italy
The development of mathematical models, control and virtual sensors for complex and nonlinear systems requires great efforts in design and calibration phases. In this presentation, new design technologies are described: NOSEM for models building, STC for controls and DVS for virtual sensing. They are based on a new systematic approach in which the real system measurements are directly used in the design process. Examples of NOSEM, STC and DVS applications to cutting-edge vehicle systems are presented, showing significant advantages in development time and costs and algorithm robustness versus variability of system operating conditions.
11:50 - The interrelationship of suspension kinematic and compliance solutions
Gene Lukianov, principal, VRAD Engineering, USA
Suspension kinematics, the process of determining the geometrical architectures, is determined early in the design; suspension compliance engineering occurs later in the design sequence. This presentation will share information as to how the early determination of kinematic (hard-point) architecture actually sets the stage for achievement of suspension compliance performance and provides a broad window of compliance alternatively instead of boxing the chassis design into mediocre design solutions as the only alternative. A methodology will be presented that can be used to understand and achieve ideal kinematic and compliance performance.
12:15 - Pushing the boundaries of compliance modelling in vehicle dynamics simulations
Dr Alfred Boulos, strategic business development manager – EMEA, MSC Software, UK
Improving compliance behaviour modelling during dynamic vehicle simulation is a constant goal, and is often required to capture more realistic vehicle ride and handling performance data. This is also a requirement for better extraction of structural loads experienced on vehicle components. As these are connected mechanical systems, several factors need to be considered collectively to achieve this goal, including how tyres interact with the road, the material and geometrical non-linear behaviour of components, the representation of frequency-dependent stiffness and damping, and the closed-loop forces/torques driven by external control systems. This presentation will detail simulation developments by highlighting application case studies.
Lunch
Workshop Part 2 - MSC.ADAMS to host 'The process for optimizing and studying the effects of suspension parameters'
13:40 - A novel vehicle motion recording platform for synchronised visuo-inertial playback
Dr Joost Venrooij, project leader, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany
Accurate measurements of vehicle manoeuvres are of great value in research, development and simulation. To this end, a recording platform was developed that can provide high-quality synchronised video/inertial data recordings of vehicle manoeuvres. The system allows for capturing stereoscopic video footage from a driver’s perspective, while simultaneously recording vehicle motion data using an inertial navigation system (INS) consisting of a FOG-based IMU and a GPS system. We have developed software to accurately synchronise the recorded video with the inertial data, and used the recordings in perceptual experiments on an 8-DOF motion simulator to realistically reproduce driving and flight scenarios.
14:05 - Modelling, control and evaluation of semi-active suspensions
Dr Jorge de Jesús Lozoya-Santos, professor, Universidad de Monterrey, Mexico
A new methodology for the modelling of passive and semi-active dampers using the characteristic diagrams is presented. The model structure and the proposed functions are numerically tractable and easy to program and execute in embedded systems. In semi-active suspension systems, four controllers are compared using two validation approaches: hardware-in-the-loop and software-in-the-loop. Results indicate the best controller is not the same in the hardware-in-the-loop and software-in-the-loop approaches. Since the motion ratio of automotive suspensions influences the performance of the semi-active control systems, the inclusion of this geometric parameter in further analysis and synthesis of semi-active suspension systems is recommended.
Break
Panel Discussion - Is the vehicle dynamicist now simply a safety engineer? Key vehicle dynamicists to take part: - Dr. Peter Schäfer, director chassis development, Porsche AG Magnus Roland, founder and owner, SA2B Damian Harty, senior staff engineer, CAE Group at Polaris Industries John Heider, vehicle dynamics development, Cayman Dynamics Tim Roebuck, function leader, Vehicle Dynamics, R&D, Lotus Engineering Chris Regan, senior project manager, Honda Research & Development Andy Kitson, vice director Chassis, SAIC Motor UK Technical Centre Karsten Schebsdat, manager of Passenger Car Chassis Tuning Jürgen Pützschler, senior engineer, Volkswagen Ag Simon Newton, chief engineer - Driving Dynamics, Williams Advanced Engineering Ruediger Hiemenz, engineering director, MANDO Corporation Guy Mathot, head of Vehicle Dynamics Development, FORD C Cars & Focus

*This program may be subject to change

Day 3

Thursday 26th June
The application of new technologies

Conference Chair - Gene Lukianov, principal, VRAD Engineering, USA

09:30 - Topological geometry dynamics as key words for future vehicle dynamics
Magnus Roland, president & CEO, Swedish Advanced Automotive Business AB, Sweden
Vehicle Systems Dynamics 2003, Vol. 39 states: 'It is not completely clear what exactly makes vehicles ‘easy to handle’. Vehicles are complex systems with human beings in the control loop…it is not yet quite clear which behaviour determines ‘good handling’.' Vehicle dynamicists with capacities of visceral experiences of driving should guide the engineering development of vehicle control from the workings of two fundamentals: ‘gravity’ and ‘mind and consciousness’. Vehicle dynamics in 2014 cannot build upon classic mechanics dating back to Newton in 1770. Gyroscopic instantaneous action caused by spin and conservation of momentum are important prerequisites for good handling.
09:55 - Unfinished business: the knowledge challenges in vehicle dynamics
Gene Lukianov, principal, VRAD Engineering, USA
A review of the state of knowledge in vehicle dynamics and the opportunities/challenges that exist in advancing understanding of the physics and engineering within the field. The author will summarise the progress of current knowledge starting with Maurice Olley, the 'Father of Vehicle Dynamics' and progressing to later publications. He will discuss the characteristics of successful vehicle dynamics performance that relies more on ‘art and experience’ than solid engineering, which implies that progress in understanding has stagnated and should be reignited. Specific challenges involving tyres, damping, frequency response, friction and suspension geometry will be discussed.
10:20 - Optimised parameter combinations of hydraulic damper modules
Dr Reinhard Sonnenburg, design engineer, ZF Friedrichshafen AG, Germany
This paper is devoted to the problem of finding optimised parameter combinations of damper modules. Different cost functions using the amplitude spectrum of the excitation and the frequency response function of the car model will be investigated, and it will be shown that for three different arbitrary road excitations there exists a parameter combination of top mount stiffness, piston rod mass and damping constant that provides an optimum for the dynamic wheel load fluctuation. The achieved advantage of the optimised damper module regarding the dynamic wheel load fluctuation compared with a simple damper can reach up to 20%.
10:45 - Re-inventing the traction controller – the radical approach
Dushyant Wadivkar, team leader, Robert Bosch GmbH, Germany
ESP algorithms have now been around for over a decade and are considered yesterday’s news or sometimes falsely as commodities. They have been exposed to a spectrum of OEM requirements and have consequently grown in complexity and maturity. Even today, they continue to be adapted to the customer wishes despite the supplier having shorter development spans and lesser funds. This challenging environment forced us to revisit one such algorithm (TCS). We are attempting to re-invent it in order to drastically reduce solution complexity and still meet the high performance expectations. This presentation will showcase our methodology, current results, our learning’s, struggles we encountered and provide insights for those whose inventions are currently on the cutting edge.
Break
11:30 - Advanced robust control of vehicle steering systems
Dr Xiao-Dong Sun, technical specialist, TRW Conekt, UK
The presentation highlights the challenges in vehicle steering system feel and control. It introduces the advanced modelling and robust control techniques to meet steering feel performance challenges, and exhibits some application cases in the robust control of EPS, steer-by-wire (SBW) and advanced steering wheel systems (ASWS).
11:55 - Vehicle diagnostics and suspension control with smart air springs
Lutz Axel May, CEO, Torque And More GmbH, Germany
Almost every vehicle category (trucks, coaches, agricultural vehicles, passenger cars) is now available with an air suspension system. In almost every vehicle category the research and development activities have expanded into smart air suspension systems. Better and actively controlled air suspension systems increase the performance of the vehicle and also offer new and exciting features. A standard air spring in the past (rubber, metal, air connectors) is now a high-tech device with integrated sensors, actuators and DSP processors. It includes the obvious features and functions we expect from a smart air-spring device, plus new developments that focus on integrated vehicle and road diagnostics.
12:20 - Circumventing the compromise between agility and stability using the DSLD
Jonas Alfredson, managing director, DsenseD Technology AB, Sweden
The DSLD technology enables the driveline to increase both the performance and the stability of a vehicle by redistributing the tyre forces. The latter allows us to tune the vehicle handling in a more balanced way for better baseline agility, without sacrificing the high-speed stability. The DSLD can be used in our vehicles with only minor changes to existing hardware, which means that DSLD is a cost-effective and, packaging-wise, very clever device that can revolutionise the way we look at differentials. In short, giving 'two vehicles in one', in the most cost-effective way possible.
12:45 - Leaning vehicle suspension systems – perpetually a future technology?
Edward Smith, technical director, TreMoto, USA
Leaning vehicle suspension systems have long been envisioned by OEMs, futurists and garage inventors, but have yet to achieve success in the market. Despite innovations in active and semi-active suspensions, fusing the elegant dynamics of motorcycles with the user-friendly stability of traditional automobiles has proved elusive. This presentation will consider attempts from automotive and motorcycle OEMs to develop active roll-control systems (Nissan Land Glider, Harley-Davidson Penster) and steer-balanced multi-wheel vehicles such as the Piaggio MP3. In the near future, the marriage of leaning vehicle suspension systems with autonomous control systems could disrupt the current vehicle dynamics paradigm.

*This program may be subject to change